Steve Jobs denies Foxconn is a sweatshop

Apple CEO Steve Jobs has denied that the iPhone and iPod maker Foxconn is a sweatshop. Jobs made his comments in an on-stage interview at the D8 technology conference in California. In his first public comments on the spate of recent suicides at Foxconn’s factory in southern China, the Apple CEO described them as “very troubling” and said Apple was “all over this”. Jobs said it appeared there were “some real issues” at Foxconn, which he said Apple was trying to understand before going in with a solution. Ten workers have died at Foxconn’s main plant in Shenzhen this year in apparent suicides and two people have been seriously injured.…

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Waterford IT Spins Out IT Firm FeedHenry

The Telecommunication Software & Systems Group (TSSG) at Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) has announced the spin-off of FeedHenry, an award-winning software firm. Using a ‘cloud-computing’ model, FeedHenry is an ‘on-demand’ enterprise mobility solution that can be accessed over the internet. The software enables applications (apps) to be developed once and then used across all mobile platforms (iPhone, Android, BlackBerry, Nokia and so on). “FeedHenry provides an efficient and cost-effective way to create new products. Using this technology, companies no longer have to develop multiple versions of apps for each device. They create one version and with a few clicks can use it across a range of platforms. It also works…

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Defogging the Cloud-Computing Myth

Too many companies think cloud computing isn’t for them, but Martha Rotter, developer, and platform team, Microsoft Ireland, believes there’s something for everyone. During a recent discussion with a handful of IT industry executives, the topic of cloud computing arose. While I was not surprised to learn that several of the organizations present were not making specific cloud-based adjustments to their software offerings, it was interesting to discover that many other organizations were discounting cloud computing completely. The reasons not to invest in cloud computing focused on existing investments, scale and price, with a frequent comment being, “We’re not large enough for it to make any difference for us to…

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Wireless Wonderland For Irish Business

The coming year will see businesses across Ireland embrace the wireless broadband revolution, but issues of security still need to be addressed. Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock or are a total technophobe, the importance of broadband to your business, from the point of view of using the internet to sell goods, provide information to customers and spot market opportunities, cannot have gone unnoticed. The problem, however, for Ireland is twofold. In the first instance, not all firms that are aware of the power of online communications have been adequately served with internet services, and those that want high-speed service often cannot get it for reasons of geography. Secondly,…

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E-commerce benefiting from economic crisis, says OECD

While the Irish and global retail sector is being pulverised by the ongoing recession, a new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) shows that e-commerce has fared well during the economic crisis and has seen continuing growth in many countries. According to the ‘Empowering Consumers in E-Commerce’ report, part of the reason for the improved fortunes of e-commerce is that as consumers have become more cost-conscious, they are increasingly going online to compare products and save money. In the US, for example, while most sectors were experiencing a downturn in the first quarter of 2009, online retail sales for 80 retailers rose by an average of…

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Govt policy endangering tech investments – Havok boss

Ireland may not get the full benefit of an €8m expansion by one the country’s most celebrated technology success stories because of retrograde income tax decisions and the lack of a proper, long-term national education strategy. Emmy Award-winning Havok is one of the world’s best-known games technology companies. Its physics middleware powers many of the top 10 global retail games, as well as special effects in top blockbuster Hollywood movies. The company, which grew from humble origins as a Trinity College Dublin campus spinout, was bought by Intel in recent years for over US$100m. Havok is planning to embark on the next phase of its growth and will invest €8m…

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