Bank of Ireland

A Great Step Forward for the BoI. Five directors have stepped down from the board of the Bank of Ireland , a move that brings the group closer to meeting the terms of the government’s committee and management renewal plan. Michael Noonan told Irish banks last month to clear out the board members and management that had been in place through the financial crisis. The bank said it continues to be “engaged” in the ongoing programme of change required by the Department of Finance. To highlight this, the Bank of Ireland announced the resignation of three non-executive directors and two directors from its board. It said the resignations were accepted “in the interests of facilitating further…

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Japanese authorities have asked the international media to refrain from sensationalist reporting on the continuing nuclear crisis at the Fukushima power plant. The Foreign Ministry blamed incorrect and sensationalist reporting for concerns that led to import restrictions on Japanese products. State Foreign Secretary Chiaki Takahashi said some of the reporting since the earthquake and tsunami hit on March 11 has been “excessive”. He cited one story – that the plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. has hired homeless people to tackle the ongoing crisis – to highlight how some erroneous reporting had been carried out. Meanwhile, at Fukushima, workers have successfully injected nitrogen into the number 1 reactor to avert…

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Enda Kenny told the Dáil today that he has asked Minister for Communications Pat Rabbitte to refer the Moriarty report to the Director for Public Prosecutions and to the Garda Commissioner. The damning report found that Michael Lowry, the then minister for transport, energy and communications, “without doubt” helped Denis O’Brien secure Ireland’s second mobile phone licence for his company, Esat Digifone, in 1995. Opposition has seized the opportunity to criticise the new government as six current ministers were cabinet members at the time of the bidding war. “This was a government decision. The principle of collective cabinet responsibility applies here. Of the present Government, six ministers sat around that table including the…

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There was never a more important time for this country to tap into the reservoir of goodwill represented by the US diaspora. Philippa Maister reports from Atlanta on the ongoing initiatives to encourage just this. By some estimates, there are 40 million men and women of Irish descent in the US. Now, more than ever, their ties to their distant homeland have become a strategic asset for Ireland  – one that diplomats here are actively working to exploit. It’s not a very hard sell. As Ambassador Michael Collins noted recently in Atlanta, Georgia: “There’s a reservoir of goodwill that wants to be mobilised”. Speaking to a crowded room exuding a…

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President Mary McAleese last night

In what is one of his first acts in the top position, Enda Kenny has slashed his own pay by €14,000. The new government has also decided to cut the pay of senior ministers. The Taoiseach’s pay is to be cut from €214,187 to €200,000. Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore’s pay is cut from €197,486 to €184,405. Ministers’ pay has been reduced to €169,275 (from €181,283), while pay for Ministers of State is cut from €139,266 to €130,042. In another cost-cutting measure, Kenny has asked the Garda, the Departments of Justice and Transport, as well as the Office of Public Works, to come up with a plan to reduce the amount spent…

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Dominic Hannigan and John Lyons will enter the Dáil next week as the first ever openly-gay politicians to be elected as TDs in Ireland. The Labour Party members won seats in Meath East (Hannigan) and Dublin North West (Lyons). Today, Labour LGBT welcomed the “historic result” and thanked voters. “History was also made in the election of not one but two openly gay TDs,” said Paul McConnell, co-chair Labour LGBT. “The election of both Dominic Hannigan (Meath East) and John Lyons (Dublin North West) as TD’s for the Labour Party is a step forward for equality in Ireland and we look forward to their contributions in the Dáil.”

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UK pub group Mitchells & Butlers has announced that chairman John Lovering is to step down later this year. The company has begun its search for a successor. Lovering will remain as chairman and director until the process is complete. Lovering only took over as chairman last year. However, the group said he has overseen the company strengthen its financial position. He said, “It has been a huge privilege to be chairman of Mitchells & Butlers.  The company is now on a much firmer footing than when I joined last year. “Group profits have improved significantly in the last year thanks to our focus of switching from volume to spend…

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The latest political poll in the UK has revealed that support for the Liberal Democrat Party is at its lowest in over 10 years. Voters seem to be turning against the LibDems because of its change of position on the university fees issue. The party was formed in 1988 and today’s poll, published in The Independent, shows its worst performance in terms of popularity to date. Only 11pc of people said they would vote for the LibDems in a general election. In last May’s election, the party received 24pc of the electorate’s vote. The Labour party received 40pc of the support from survey participants, with the Conservatives following closely at…

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Regarded by many as the world’s leading negotiator, Prof Stuart Diamond has advised companies and governments on conflict resolution, and in 2008 was responsible for settling the seemingly intractable Hollywood writers’ strike. He spoke to Ann O’Dea. According to Stuart Diamond we are always negotiating, whether making a business deal, talking to friends or even driving a car. It’s the basic form of all human interaction, he says, and most of us are terrible at it. Diamond is a recognised authority on the subject: he runs the most popular course at Wharton Business School and has advised major corporations and governments on conflict resolution. In February 2008 he was called…

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Fujitsu Ireland CEO Regina Moran is upbeat about both the prospects for her organisation, and the long-term prospects for Ireland. She speaks to Grainne Rothery about leadership for success. Her concern around the impact she has on the people she works with through their day-to-day interactions says a lot about Fujitsu Ireland CEO Regina Moran and her style of leadership. Moran, who was appointed to her current role in May 2009 following the merger of the three existing Fujitsu businesses in Ireland, claims that one of the most important things she has learnt around leadership over the years is the effect leaders have on people, both positive and negative. “I’m…

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